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8/24/2010 6:05:26 PM  

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Duties Fulfilled or Misconstrued

 

The piece that follows was sent to me by Andy Roberts in the U.K. and is reprinted with his per-mission. According to Andy, it was published in the History of Education Journal in November of 1999. Andy can be contacted via e-mail at a.roberts@bcftcs.ac.uk
Abstract
Mentoring has and is receiving much attention within the education arena. This paper offers an historical account of the origins of the term mentor, examining the role of the character Mentor in Homer’s The Odyssey and Fenelon’s Les Adventures de Telemaque. Many authors refer the reader to The Odyssey when discussing the supposed original mentoring dyad: these authors tend to extrapolate from the premise that Homer’s Mentor was a protective, guiding and supportive figure who acted as a wise and trusted counsellor to Telemachus, son of King Ulysses.
Taking an oft suggested return to Homer’s The Odyssey shows that this is not the case. This paper argues that Mentor, in this work, was simply an old friend of King Ulysses who largely failed in his duties of keeping the King’s household intact. Focus is put onto the French writer and educa-tionalist Fenelon, and his novel of instruction Les Adventures deTelemaque. It is argued that within this work one finds the Mentor whose attributes, functions and behaviours have become synonymous with the modern day usage of the term mentor and the action of mentoring. Recogni-tion of Fenelon’s Mentor, as opposed to Homer’s minor character, is called for.
* * * * * * * * *
The word mentor is of Greek origin. The Oxford English Dictionary gives
mentor as:
“allusively, one who fulfils the office which the supposed Mentor fulfilled towards Telema-chus. b. Hence, as common noun: An experienced and trusted advisor.”
According to Klein (1967:964), Men is ‘one who thinks’, ‘tor’ is the masculine suffix, ‘trix’ the feminine. Therefore, he gives mentor meaning a man who thinks, and Mentrix, a woman who thinks. This, however, is not a description that sufficiently verbalises the current uses of mentor-ing. Debates on the concept appear to have their root within the Oxford English Dictionary defini-tion. Such debates have forwarded mentors as role models, as counsellors, as advisors, as teach-ers, as nurturers, as friends and as sponsors: Smith and Alred (1992:109) have put forward men-toring as a ‘civilising’ process. Interest in the action of mentoring seems to have been initiated by Levinson’s et al (1978) The Season’s of a Man’s Life. Although Wynch (1986:3) reported a pau-city of information on the theory of the mentoring role some eleven years ago, writings on men-tors and the action of mentoring have since proliferated. Such proliferation caused Little (1990:297) to caution us that:
“...relative to the amount of pragmatic activity, the volume of empirical enquiry is small [and]... that rhetoric and action have outpaced both conceptual development and empirical war-rant.”
For an example of attenuated conceptual development, return to the word mentor. The first re-corded usage - and the first time that it was anthropomorphised - was in Homer’s epic poem The Odyssey. Many writings (Anderson and Shannon, 1995; Bushardt et al. 1991; Carruthers, 1993; Donovan, 1990; Daloz, 1983; Field, 1993; Jarvis, 1995; Kalbfleisch & Keyton, 1995; Little, 1990; Meginnson & Clutterbuck, 1995; Monaghan, 1995; Murray, 1991; Parsloe, 1995; Shea, 1992; Smith and Alred, 1993; Stammers, 1992; Tickle, 1993) on the terms mentor and mentoring will invariably involve the reader being taken back to Homer’s epic poem about the adventures of

2.Homer’s Mentor: Duties Fulfilled or Misconstrued
Odysseus, King of Ithaca, during his return from the Trojan war and the ‘drama of his homecom-ing’ (Rieu.1946:11. It is this translation of The Odyssey quoted throughout this paper). The above mentionend authors tend to extrapolate from the premise that Homer’s Mentor was a wise and trusted figure who displayed, towards Odysseus’s son Telemachus, the admirable qualities of counsellor, teacher, nurturer, protector, advisor and role model. Anderson and Shannon (1995:25) state that:
“.....Odysseus, a great royal warrior, has been away fighting the Trojan war, and has entrusted his son, Telemachus, to his friend and adviser, Mentor. Mentor has been charged with advising and serving as guardian to the entire royal household.”
Carruthers (1993:9) gives a further dimension, that:
“This meant that Mentor had to be a father figure, a teacher, a role model, an approachable counsellor, a trusted adviser, a challenger, an encourager.”
Little (1990: 298) expands this theme stating that:
“.....the relationship required of Mentor was a full measure of wisdom, integrity and personal investment.”
Smith and Alred (1993:103) claim that Mentor is essentially a stand-in for Odysseus, and assert that he must ‘personify the kingly quality of wisdom’. Anderson and Shannon (1995: 25-26) take the classical reference further. They give that mentoring is an ‘intentional’ process, as Mentor deliberately and carefully carried out his duties towards Telemachus; and that mentoring is a ‘nur-turing’ process as it was Mentor’s duty to ‘draw forth the full potential in Telemachus’. They quote Clawson (1980) who claims that it was Mentor’s task to help Telemachus ‘grow in wisdom without rebellion’, and finally, they state (ibid) that mentoring is a ‘supportive, nurturing process’ - as Telemachus was to respond to the advice of Mentor, in order to develop into self-sufficiency during the drama which was played out in The Odyssey.
The cliched classical image is a friendly one. But, was the original Mentor wisdom incarnate? Did he guide, counsel, advise, and enable the young Telemachus? Was a supportive, nurturing and intentional process evident within Homer’s writings? Did Mentor ‘keep everything intact’ as instructed by Odysseus? (Rieu.1946:43). The above mentioned authors talk along these lines. But an oft suggested return to The Odyssey reveals a somewhat different picture of the character Men-tor than the one so often portrayed in the mentoring literature.
Although many writers take the reader back to The Odyssey, not all of these mention that it was the goddess Pallas Athene, goddess of the strange dyad, war and wisdom, who took Mentor’s form so as to guide, counsel and enable both Odysseus and his son Telemachus through their journey and return home. In fact (or myth?) Mentor was only one of several forms which Pallas Athene took in the quest to help her ‘favourite’ Telemachus (Rieu.1946:17). Her first appearance was that: “.....of a Taphian chieftain named Mentes.” (ibid:28).
She also assumed the form of a seagull (:60), the daughter of a ship’s captain named Dymas (:102), a young shepherd (:208), a tall, beautiful and accomplished woman (:248), a swallow (:334), Iphthime a daughter of King Icarius (:85), a young girl carrying a pitcher (:112), a woman (:304) and Telemachus (:47), as well as the form of Mentor, on two occasions, for her purposes.

3.Homer’s Mentor: Duties Fulfilled or Misconstrued
Mentor: who was he? Mentor, son of Alcimus, was by no means a major figure within The Odys-sey. It is not stated, or even inferred, that he is an adviser or counsellor to Telemachus, wise, pru-dent or otherwise. The first mention of Mentor (:43) gives:
“.....Mentor rose to speak. Mentor was an old friend of Odysseus, to whom the King had en-trusted his whole household when he sailed, with orders to defer to the aged Laertes [Odys-seus’s father] and keep everything intact.”
More of a caretaker’s role? The only reference to Mentor (:333) that Odysseus himself gives is:
“Remember your old friend and the good turns I’ve done you in the past. Why, you and I were boys together.”
No mention of his advising or counselling or nurturing the young Telemachus is ever given. On Mentor’s role of having been entrusted with the whole household and of keeping ‘everything in-tact’, it begets the question: why was Odysseus’s household overrun and why did his wife Pene-lope, a ‘model of fidelity, chastity and patience’ (Groliers.1995) have to resort to deception to keep her unwanted ‘suitors’ at bay? As one of her old servants (:341) exclaims:
“Odysseus has come home, and high time too! And he’s killed the rogues who turned his whole house inside out, ate up his wealth, and bullied his son”.
Consider Telemachus (:38):
“Turning first to old Aegyptius, he began.....in the first place I have lost my good father, who was King among you here and as gentle as a father to you all. But there was a far greater ca-lamity to follow, one which may well bring my home to utter ruin and rob me of any livelihood I have. A mob of hangers-on are pestering my mother with their unwanted attentions...they spend their whole time in and out of our place. They slaughter our oxen, our sheep, our fatted goats; they feast themselves and drink our sparkling wine with never a thought for all the wealth that is being wasted. The truth is that there is no one like Odysseus in charge to purge the house of this disease.”
Where was Mentor, the wise and able old man of the modern interpretation? How effective was he in carrying out his duties that had been given to him by his old friend King Odysseus? Did he keep everything intact? As Nestor admits to Telemachus (:56):
“.....I have been told that a whole crowd of young gallants are courting your mother and run-ning riot in your house as uninvited guests.”
Regarding the role of Mentor as advising, counselling and protecting the King’s son, consider Telemachus’s statement to Antinous (:45) that:
“Isn’t it enough that all this time, under pretext of your suit, you have been robbing me of my best, while I was still too young to understand? I tell you, now that I’m old enough to learn from others what has happened and to feel my own strength at last, I will not last until I have let hell loose upon you.”
Where was Mentor? Where was he when Telemachus was too young to understand? Does the modern interpretation not claim that he was supposed to act as a father figure? An advisor? A wise counsellor?

4. Homer’s Mentor: Duties Fulfilled or Misconstrued
It is the ‘goddess of the flashing eyes’ Pallas Athene who commands the attention during The Od-yssey: it is she who plays the leading, if not the heroines part in the plot, not Mentor. It was the goddess who guided, protected and enabled her favourite Telemachus, not Mentor. She tells him (:210):
“And yet you did not know me, Pallas Athene, Daughter of Zeus, who [will] always stand by your side and guard you through all your adventures.”
She assumed Mentor’s form on two occasions: but Mentor, without her, was by no means suc-cessful in the duties given to and expected of him.
Consider the household overrun, the King’s wealth dissipating and the young Telemachus left too young to understand. As Telemachus explains, he is now old enough to learn from others: was Mentor, in the modern interpretation, not supposed to fulfil that role? He failed in his duty to keep everything intact, in his supposed duty of developing Telemachus’s self-sufficiency. An argument is forwarded here for Mentor being an old friend of King Odysseus and nothing more. To con-solidate this view, consider the statement (:68) of Nestor’s son, Peisistratus:
“So Nestor of Gerenia sent me with him [Telemachus] for escort, as Telemachus was anxious to see you, in case you might help him with advice or suggest some kind of action. For a son, when his father has gone, has many difficulties to cope with at home, especially if there is no one else to help him, as is the case with Telemachus, whose father is abroad and who has no other friends in the place to protect him from injustice.”
According to the modern interpretation, was Mentor not supposed to do just that? Why, then, has the word mentor become synonymous with wisdom, guidance, counselling and advising?
In 1699, ‘Les Adventures de Telemaque’ was first published. Francois de Salignac de La Mothe-Fenelon (1651-1715) was a French mystic, religious writer and educator. Much of his life was devoted to the cause of education. He wrote the widely popular ‘Traite de l’Education de Filles’ (1687) which was (Kunitz & Colby.1967:274):
“...a treatise on education that anticipates Rousseau’s Emile in its liberal views and its empha-sis on training...”
In 1689 he was appointed tutor to Louis XIV’s grandson, the Duke of Burgundy, and heir appar-ent to the throne. The pupil-teacher relationship was apparently a happy and successful one. In 1699, Fenelon wrote ‘Les Adventures de Telemaque’. This was his most popular book; in fact the most reprinted book in the 18th century and ‘pedagogues of every sort found the book a god-send’ (Clarke.1984:202). ‘Telemaque’ was an imitation of Homer’s classic The Odyssey: the story is a ‘continuation’ of the epic poem and was written as a thinly-veiled allegorical attack upon the ab-solutism of Louis XIV - le Roi Soleil - and as a method of instructing the young heir in the duties of royalty.
Fenelon takes his hero Telemaque through a series of adventures which ‘uniformly illustrate his thesis that an ideal monarch should be a man of peace, wisdom and simple ways of life’ (Kunitz & Colby, 1967:274).
Any comparative reading of The Odyssey and Les Adventures de Telemaque will almost immedi-ately give rise to substantial differences between Homer’s Mentor and Fenelon’s Mentor (whose

5 .Homer’s Mentor: Duties Fulfilled or Misconstrued
form the goddess Minerva assumed exclusively throughout the book). Consider the following quotes (translation by Riley, 1994) from Les Adventures de Telemaque:
“...I have been seeking my father all over the sea, in the company of this man [Mentor] who was to me another father.” (:54)
“Oh happy Telemachus! you will never be bewildered as I have been bewildered, while you have such a guide and instructor! Mentor, you are the master!” (:136)
“Forget not, my son, the pains I took when you were a child, to make you as wise and as val-iant as your father.” (:160)
“[Mentor] regulated the whole course of the life of Telemachus in order to raise him to the highest pitch of glory.” (:215)
Many examples of the wisdom, the support, the nurturing and the guidance of Fenelon’s Mentor may be quoted: few such examples may be found regarding Homer’s Mentor. Clarke (:201) tells that:
“In The Odyssey Mentor plays a secondary role. Homer focuses upon the trials of the Father, not of the education of the son. But the figure of Mentor was there...ready to be exploited by someone who was primarily concerned with education...that someone was Fenelon.”
The popularity of the book Telemaque may well account, as Anderson and Shannon (1995:26) point out, for the fact that the word mentor did not seem to appear in the English language before 1750. (The Oxford English Dictionary states that the word was first used in 1750 by Chestere in Letters to Son, 8th March). Clarke (1984:202) asserts that:
“...by the early eighteenth century and unlike Telemaque, who remained his strictly fictive status, Mentor had entered both French and English as a common noun.”
It is thanks to Fenelon, and the ‘age of enlightenment’, that the modern day allusions of the word mentor were brought into the language at all. It is thanks to Fenelon that the term mentor was resurrected from circa 1000 b.c. and brought into the language circa 1750 a.d., thus filling a gap of some three millennia. It is argued here that it is Fenelon’s Mentor, not Homer’s, that should be referred to when considering the popular environmental connotations that the word mentor now implies. Any reading of The Odyssey will not find such rich references to the character Mentor that counsels, guides, nurtures, advises and enables.
It is not the aim here to simply add to the difficulties inherent in allowing definitional clarity of the term mentor and the action mentoring. Writers often strive for such clarity. These writings are mainly valid, well constructed and fluent discussions which call upon empiricism and reasoned discourse in their attempts to delineate and express the perspectives, the systems, the processes and the actions that constitute mentoring. They attempt to put mentoring into relevant context.
This discourse does, however, aim to distinguish the Homeric Mentor and the Fenelonian Mentor. Fenelon was considered a great educator: his book was the most popular of the 18th century. This discourse does aim to credit him with endowing his character Mentor with qualities that are analogous with the current use of the term. As Clarke’s eloquent essay shows, The Odyssey is more concerned with the trials of Odysseus than with the education of Telemachus (1984:201).

6. Homer’s Mentor: Duties Fulfilled or Misconstrued
The true Mentor was created by Fenelon, not Homer, and exists in Les Adventures de Telemaque, not in The Odyssey.
Homer’s The Odyssey is rightly termed a ‘classic’: it is the first appearance of the word mentor. However, this should not result in the qualities of Homer’s Mentor being continually miscon-strued, however well the intention. It is argued here that the extrapolation of the attributes of Homer’s Mentor into modern day mentoring is illusory. Fenelon’s Les Adventures de Telemaque is a masterly piece; a continuation of The Odyssey written from an educational vista. It is Fenelon, not Homer, who endows his Mentor with the qualities, abilities and attributes that have come to be incorporated into the action of modern day mentoring. With only thought and consideration, Fenelon’s work may well regain its rightful place within the future writings on the concepts of mentor and mentoring.
Acknowledgements:
Thanks to Dr. Glenn Rikowski for support, guidance and encouragement.
 

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8/24/2010 5:38:59 PM  

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The global banking crisis, big business bankruptcies and the share market plummeting, has hit some people hard. It can be easy to succumb to the doom and gloom of the media or become overwhelmed by events. This is when a mentor may step in with words of wisdom, a reality check or a huge challenge.
Having taken a multi million-dollar hit to his business, one CEO thought his business might not survive the latest impact of the global crisis. Telling his mentor what a terrible day it was and suffering the pain of possible failure, he expected sympathy. Instead, his mentor pushed a shift in thinking with a series of sharp questions: How many days have you been in business? How many terrible days have you survived? You have survived the loss of a loved one and rebuilt your life. Was that without pain? After that knee reconstruction, was getting back into sport without pain? Take another look at this situation, how might it just be the best thing that ever happened? There is always an opportunity for the astute during a downturn.
The mentor's comments were not just spin, hype or motivation. There is truth in the saying: What doesn't kill you makes you stronger. Who in life cannot look back on an event that was terrible at the time yet shaped a better future? We are inspired by the para-olympians, stories of ordinary people who have done extraordinary things after suffering adversity and everyday heroes who act in the moment of catastrophe. In times of crisis a mentor will remind us of these simple truths.
On a bad day, a mentor will provide empathy rather than sympathy. A mentor will listen and allow you to ventilate your natural emotional response to events. They are non-judgemental and will understand how you feel about your circumstances but a mentor won't play the pity party game.
A mentoring conversation is not about glossing over, dismissing or ignoring events, pain or emotion. On the contrary, the mentoring conversation allows you to confront issues, process disempowering thoughts and feelings and choose a new response.
The mentoring conversation focuses on stimulating reflection and action. Using questions that stimulate thinking your mentor will challenge your thinking to overcome blame, shame and negativity. They will help you put things in perspective, consider a different point of view and ultimately choose a way to move forward.
Ironically, the current economic situation provides a metaphor. The direct cause and effect of the financial misadventure in sub-prime mortgages is only part of the picture. It is the crisis of confidence in the financial market that may cause a ripple effect to grow into a tsunami. It is how people feel, what they think and what they do in response to any event that produces the real outcome. Panic or despair will exacerbate any crisis.
Likewise in life, it is not what happens to us but our reaction to what happens that produces results. Mentoring enables you to process thoughts and feelings and choose a response. A mentor's cool head and a warm heart, skilful listening and powerful questions are the reasons why mentoring works.
Find a Mentor… they are worth their weight in gold!
 

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8/24/2010 5:36:33 PM  

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Did you know that one of the greatest factors toward success for people in modern society is to have someone that believes in you and cares for you? Each of us can look at our lives and recall people who touched it in meaningful and powerful ways. These people offered us guidance, support, wisdom, a safe haven where we could expose our uncertainties and grow as perpetual learners. These people were our mentors, whether we realized it or not. In our social context many people refer to people they admire as their mentor. For example a woman might refer to Oprah as her mentor. This is not a suitable use of the term Mentor because there is not a personal relationship between Oprah and the woman. Mentoring requires a personal relationship.
To find the origins of mentoring we need to travel back in time to the period of Odysseus. He was a great royal warrior, but in order to be a warrior he had to leave his wife and son home alone – the same as our warriors must do today. However, Odysseus was King of Ithaca, and when kings go off to war – there are consequences. His wife Penelope, a ‘model of fidelity, chastity and patience’ and was extremely beautiful. She became the target of men who wished to take over the power of Odysseus. Penelope had to resort to a great deal of deception to keep her unwanted ‘suitors’ at bay.
Penelope and Odysseus had a son named Telemachus. The boy was remarkably talented and well suited to the role he would have to play when he became king after his father. While Odysseus was away fighting the Trojan war, he entrusted his son, Telemachus, to his friend and adviser, Mentor. Mentor was charged with advising and serving as guardian to the entire royal household. Mentor was a wise and trusted figure who displayed, towards Odysseus’s son Telemachus, the admirable qualities of counselor, teacher, nurturer, protector, advisor and role model. It was a big job.
Although Mentor does not appear to have been particularly successful in his job (see Andy Roberts’ paper “Homer’s Mentor”) the term mentor is understood to relate to the promotion intentional learning, which includes capacity building through methods such as instructing, coaching, providing experiences, modeling and advising. Mentoring -- when it works -- taps into continuous learning that is not an event, or even a string of discrete events. Rather, it is the synthesis of ongoing event, experiences, observation, studies, and thoughtful analyses.

What Mentors Do :

• Set high expectations of performance
• Offer challenging ideas
• Help build self-confidence
• Encourage professional behavior
• Offer friendship
• Listen to personal problems
• Confront negative behaviors and attitudes
• Teach by example
• Provide growth experiences
• Offer quotable quotes
• Explain how the Department/Agency works
• Coach their mentees
• Offer wise counsel
• Stand by their mentees in critical situations
• Encourage winning behavior
• Trigger self-awareness
• Inspire their mentees
• Share critical knowledge
• Offer encouragement
• Assist with their Mentee's careers 

 

 

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8/24/2010 5:32:36 PM  

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The most commonly cited obstacle to mentoring is lack of time. And who is not busy? At work and in life most of us are rushing from one activity to another in a frenzy of busy-ness. We live at a frenetic pace, in what's become a 24/7 world. What to do?
There are only four ways we can make more time available.

1. Efficiency

Use tools, techniques and technology to do things more quickly. To do lists, diaries, systems, checklists and clever equipment, help speed up, save time and do things right. But speeding up, without addressing the other three pillars of creating time only increases stress and our current fool-hardy tendencies toward busy-ness that are destroying quality of life.

2. Effectiveness

Apply the 80:20 principle, which says that 80% of results come from just 20% of actions, to ensure that you prioritise, delegate and do the right things. Just like your financial budget, look at where you are spending and decide what is and isn't a worthwhile investment of your time. What outcomes are produced from what you do? Could someone else achieve the same at less cost to you? Where does your effort make a difference and what really doesn't matter?

3. Stop!

Cease doing things that make no difference, waste time or worse, debilitate you. Avoid mind-numbing, energy sapping, harmful activities (or people) that drain energy or get in the way of productivity. This includes anything with a negative impact on you physically, mentally, emotionally or spiritually. Such things as most TV, certain foods, and too much alcohol, reading or listening to doom and gloom and some kinds of music are real threats to your wellbeing. Consider jettisoning or delegating activities you don't need, enjoy or do well. Delegate what could be done adequately, or better, by others. 

4. Start
Invest time in those things that calm, energise and revitalize. Increase wellbeing through nutrition, exercise, leisure, pleasure, relaxation, meditation, mental stimulation, emotional and social support and your choice of spiritual connection.
Traditional time management teaches these practices. However, the four pillars of creating time depend on one overarching element:

  • A clear sense of purpose,
  • A vision of where you are going,
  • A mission and principles to guide you.
  • When a compelling reason dominates what you do, it is reflected in the goals you set. Priorities automatically fall into place. Energy is focused and obstacles are overcome. You know why you want to do what you are doing and you figure out how best to do it.
  • Consciously held vision switches on the unconscious and releases creativity. Focus creates flow. Awareness of your mission and acceptance of your vital role to fulfill it is the difference between mere motivation and inspiration.

Ultimately, living in alignment with your purpose brings balance into your life because achieving it results in self-preservation and optimum performance.
The aim of mentoring is to help people identify and achieve their goals. More than anything else, alignment with purpose increases the likelihood of achieving goals. When mentors ask questions and listen and those mentored are willing to go deep to find their answers, the relationship becomes a sanctuary for soul-searching. This is the power of mentoring. This is why mentoring works.

 

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8/23/2010 6:24:28 PM  

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  LEARNING FROM MENTORING

"Mentoring", this Greek term has been used in countless ways so you can expect that there are various wise mentoring quotes that abound. But it all refers to the same concept, giving guidance and advice to another person. The term "mentoring" actually comes from the Greek word that means enduring. This is a committed relationship between a youth and an adult wherein the adult has the patience to teach the youth whatever he knows from life. It is the adult's responsibility to provide support, assistance, and guidance as the younger one faces new challenges and problems every day. Mentors often take the role of the parents when the parent is busy or unavailable during the critical stages of a young person's life.

There are basically two types of mentoring; the first is natural mentoring and the second is planned mentoring. Natural mentoring can come from everyday situations wherein anyone can be your mentor. You can learn through collegiality, through friendship, through teaching, or through counseling. On the other hand, planned mentoring comes from a structured program wherein the mentor and the mentee are chosen from a list and matched through a formal procedure.

Currently, mentoring is becoming increasingly popular in the workforce as well as for personal development. This is partly due to various testimonials among people who have tried it and derived a lot of advantages from the mentoring program. But how does mentoring exactly work? Well, if you want to look into the formal mentoring programs, you should be aware that your mentor will be chosen by an authority figure through interviews, comparative index outlook, and by looking at their personal profiles.

Of course, in most cases, the mentor and the mentee would need to get acquainted first before the mentoring program can start. Mentors are needed because they can be a positive influence on the mentee who is learning from them. As Gandhi once said, "Be the change you want to see in the world." Mentors can be a force of change and they can influence a lot of people, including you, by becoming a respected authority figure.

Ralph Waldo Emerson stated that, "You cannot do a kindness too soon, for you never know how soon it will be too late." And indeed, mentors are doing kindness when they take on the responsibility of helping other people learn from their experiences. Through this, they can give back to society and make career growth, personal development, or intellectual achievement possible for the person they are mentoring.

As you can observe, mentoring is helpful for educational purposes wherein the mentor will help the mentee improve their overall academic achievement. Likewise, mentoring is also very helpful in the workplace because mentors can provide the necessary insights and perspectives on what a person should do to achieve his goals. Meanwhile, having a mentor would also be a very helpful option in your personal development because the mentor can help you during tough personal and social stress and offer guidance just when you need it the most.

A very nice quote from an unknown author read, "A lot of people have gone further than they thought they could because someone else thought they could." The mentor does just that, they believe that their mentees can do it. This, in itself, is usually encouragement enough for the mentee to do their best to succeed in life.

Look for a mentor and learn…
 

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8/10/2010 7:19:04 AM  

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If any of you have asked for them, I'll be mailing them
by the end of next week. And those of you who hadn't
asked for them, I'll add you to the list if I receive your mail by
Monday morning!

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8/10/2010 7:19:04 AM  

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coming up. I owe a lot to readers like you who have   
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